Citizen Journalism on the Rise

The invention of the internet has effectively ended capitalism. Thanks to the internet, users can create, publish, and mass distribute their own original content, with zero marginal costs, a once impossible fete thanks to the ideologies of capitalism.

This phenomena has lead to the creation of a multitude of things, including a new wave of celebrity and fame, but one of the most crucial creations is the concept of the citizen journalist.

With our modern-day technology and instant, global access spanning an infinite audience, users are now able to report on daily events, faster than professional establishments, such as those in the legacy media (TV, Newspaper, Radio), can even react to. Even guides on how to effectively use everyday gadgets, such as smartphones, to produce high-quality work are now standard throughout the internet.

Although many argue that citizen journalism is killing journalism as a profession, it’s provided a voice to those without one. For example, China is a notoriously regulated and monitored nation, with the Government being able to successfully crack down on publishers if the content goes against the state. That’s why Han Han, the number 1 most followed blogger and citizen journalist in the world, is so successful.

In a country where regulations and secrets are kept tight, Han Han can report on stories in the safety and comfort of his home, with the ability to instantly publish with no costs thanks to the internet.

Another example would be when the Sudanese Government suddenly banned the distribution and reading of 10 different newspapers in Sudan, for the content was controversial. This censorship sparked an uproar, and citizen journalists took to the streets to find out why.

Although not popular with the legacy media, because of its capitalistic economic structure, citizen journalism is here to stay, as long as there’s news to report on, and the internet to facilitate it.

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